Troy University, Alabama has launched a new program to teach undergraduate students the principles of free market economics to counter corporate ideology.

Professor Allen Mendenhall, who heads the Free Enterprise Scholars program that begins in the fall semester, stated that he believes that ethical businesses follow rules, treat other people with respect, and allow cooperation and trust between diverse individuals. He also believes that businesses can provide value through producing goods and services that improve our lives.

The Manuel H. Johnson Center for Political Economy at Troy University hosts a voluntary program that has already accepted nine students. They will be spending the semester discussing and reading a variety of texts, including “Seven Deadly Economic Sins” (by Jim Otteson) and “Woke, Inc.” by Vivek Rajaswamy.

Students will be able to listen to and build relationships with monthly speakers. They also receive training in writing opinion pieces. This program will feature an annual keynote speech by journalists who are experts in business and commerce economics.

Mendenhall stated that he and Professor Dan Sutter were inspired to create the program after reading “Woke Inc.” which examined the negative cultural effects that woke, politically-correct ideology has on U.S. corporations.

Troy University Professor Allen Mendenhall wearing a dress shirt and suspenders
Professor Allen Mendenhall is associate dean at the Sorrell College at Troy University. (Allen Mendenhall).

“Wakeism is interesting because it undercuts historically liberal principles such as equality under the law and due process, which have been hard-won over centuries.┬áHe continued, “And they’re all being thrown away the window in pursuit to an incoherent doctrine.”

He referred to John McWhorter’s book, “Woke Racism” and noted that some elements of woke ideology had taken on almost a religious tone.

Mendenhall said it was difficult to pick out just two reasons why corporations would adopt woke ideology, but he stressed the importance of young people who “cause a lot of fuss.”

Mendenhall stated that the scholars program’s response has been “mostly positively” thus far.